Tag Archives: Sabhal Mòr Ostaig

An Cùrsa Inntrigidh – Aonad a H-Aon

Fàilte air ais!

It’s been a good few weeks since I blogged about my decision to start a Gaelic beginner’s distance learning course offered by Sabhal Mòr Ostaig, Scotland’s only Gaelic language college. Well, in those few weeks the course has begun and we formally completed Aonad a H-Aon (Unit One) last week. We are now getting stuck into Aonad a Dhà (Unit Two) – in total there are six units in this block, ending with Aonad a Sia, which wraps up in mid-June. There are then a further two blocks which will take place in the Autumn and then early next year. I haven’t yet signed up for these other blocks, known as Earrann a Dhà and Earrann a Tr­ì, but probably will. However, one step at a time.

Content-wise, the course is made up of one hour long tutorial per week allied to roughly 10-12 hours of my own time reviewing the relevant notes. At the moment the tutorial still contains a fair amount of English language conversation, with the clear aim being that over the coming weeks it will become almost entirely Gaelic. To do this we are currently learning to be able to say handy things like:

  • Ciamar a tha thu ag ràdh …?  How do you say …?
  • Ciamar a tha thu a’ sgriobhadh …?  How do you write …?
  • Gabh mo leisgeul, can sin a-rithist!  Excuse me, say that again!

At the moment my range of conversation hasn’t moved much beyond initial pleasantries i.e. how are you, what’s your name, where do you live etc. However, I get the feeling that the pace will ramp up over the coming weeks and so hopefully by the end of Earrann a H-Aon I will be able to make Gaelic small talk that reaches into areas more akin to what I might actually say to someone in English.

One thing I am very keen to do is to have conversations with other learners outside of the class. This would be in the form of Skype calls. Nothing elaborate, just 15 minutes of chat in which we cover a combination of class notes and ad-hoc conversation. There are a couple of very lively Facebook pages, primarily Let’s Learn Gaelic, which will hopefully provide one or two willing accomplices. Pronunciation is one of the hardest things to master in Gaelic and the more conversations you have the better.

The last thing I will say, for now, is that you need to want to do this sort of course. There is quite a lot of work, and with most of it being done on your own, you have to have the right motivation. I like to think I do and so far I’ve really enjoyed getting to know every new word and grammar rule.

Le deagh dhùrachdan.

Pòl.

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Speaking Our Language – ag ionnsachadh Gàidhlig na h-Alba

At least twice before I’ve attempted to learn (Scottish) Gaelic. However, on each occasion, I’ve given up without too much of a fight. Learning a new language, particularly one where pronunciation isn’t intuitive to English speakers, can be difficult. For all that the fire has still burned and at the third attempt, I’m hopeful that I finally have lift off.

In my hometown, a Gaelic Conversation class started in early November. The class is run by a native Gaelic speaker from the Isle of Lewis who has kindly given up her Friday nights for the cause. After an initial surge of interest, the class has trimmed down to half a dozen or so who seem keen to learn. Think to start with people turn up and are immediately put off by the quirky pronunciation and sentence constructs. At that point, if the motivation isn’t strong you could be put off. That said, learning anything new will have an initial knowledge curve, but that shouldn’t put people off if it’s something they truly want to do, and importantly, have the time and drive to commit to the process. My personality may have many flaws but one I do have is a stickability to see something through when it truly interests and intrigues me, especially when there is genuine motivation allied to an intellectual challenge.

Well, why do I want to learn Gaelic? Several reasons. First and foremost because I still believe that Gaelic is Scotland’s language. For many reasons lost in the mists of time, the language was pushed away from the mainland out to the Island fringes. However, the language has never died and I want to play a small part in making sure it never does. It’s not about creating a difference between  Scotland and other countries, it’s about holding onto something Scottish. Something in which much of our history and culture remains wrapped – for example, there are many lowland (and indeed border) towns which have place names rooted in Gaelic. On a more direct level, I  want to make my Scottish Islands website (www.lonely-isles.com) bilingual. I want to blog and read Gaelic. I’d also like to speak it, if and when chances arrive.

While I continue to plan on attending my local conversational class I have also decided to strike while the iron is well and truly hot. Scotland’s only Gaelic language college, Sabhal Mòr Ostaig on the Isle of Skye, runs a three-part introductory course in Gaelic. It is a distance learning course and will be spread over 18 or so months. Hopefully, by the end, I will have a solid foundation on which to build on over the coming years.

I will, of course, write a regular diary on my blog so those reading can keep up to speed on my progress. I warn you now that you may be seeing more and more Gaelic on my blog, but fear not, an English translation will always be provided. Finally, as this is going to be my last blog of the year then it seems only appropriate to end with the following greeting:

Nollaig Chridheil agus Bliadhna Mhath Ùr!

(Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!)

Thanks for reading.